BEVO BEAT

Snapchat app hits recruiting

Posted February 11th, 2014

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If you’re over the age of 30, you may have never heard of Snapchat. If you happen to also be a college football coach, you better learn fast.

The Texas Compliance office announced via Twitter on Tuesday that college coaches will have the ability to Snapchat with prospective recruits beginning Aug. 1.

Snapchat is one of the most popular social media apps on the market – it was the sixth-most downloaded free iPhone app of 2013. It allows you to send a picture or video of up to ten seconds in length to one or more friends. The catch is, the files come with a time limit – when the time is up, the “Snap” goes away.

Think “Mission: Impossible” without the mini explosion.

Recruiting is a sordid place full of under-the-table deals already. Will this new technology make things worse? Probably not. Dirty coaches will find a way to be dirty with or without expiring photos or videos.

Coaches will be able to send photos or videos as harmless as looks into a locker room after a win, a stocked trophy case, a beautiful day on campus, or even, Bevo help us, a selfie. They could also be ways to show a recruit a perk waiting for him that the NCAA wouldn’t approve – like an all-expenses paid off-campus apartment, or money.

Realistically, it’s nothing more than what coaches could show or promise a recruit in a private conversation at some point during his recruitment. If that coach is going to promise things deemed illegal by the NCAA, Snapchat just offers another way to drive his point home.

In the ever-evolving world of technology (and recruiting), Snapchat is just the latest widely accepted form of communication. And now grown men who lead big time college football programs across the country will join millions of teenyboppers in the selfie craze.

Time to practice the duck face.

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