Rodolfo Gonzalez/American-Statesman: Texas' head coach, Mack Brown, right, shakes hands with West Virginia's quarterback, #12, Geno Smith, left, after the Mountaineers defeated Texas 48-45 at the University of Texas' Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium in Austin, Texas, on Saturday, October 6, 2012.

Football

Texas countdown to football: 5 largest crowds in DKR history

Posted August 13th, 2016

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The football season is approaching fast, and Texas fans are getting excited. Counting today, there are 23 days until the start of the football season. To help celebrate, we’re counting down five things every day until the start of the season.

Royal-Memorial Stadium has undergone many, many expansions and changes since opening in 1924. The latest expansion came in 2009, when stands were added in the south end zone that raised the capacity to 100,119.  But what are the biggest crowds ever to see the Longhorns play in Austin?

Here are the five largest crowds in DKR history:

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5. Texas 51, Kansas 20, Nov. 21, 2009: Attendance: 101,357

11/21/09 Ralph Barrera/AMERICAN-STATESMAN; Darrell K. Royal Memorial Stadium, Austin, TX.--Texas Longhorn senior quarterback Colt McCoy takes one last look around the stadium as he prepares for his final home game of the season against Kansas. He caries a wooden board with the phrase
Senior quarterback Colt McCoy takes one last look around Royal-Memorial Stadium as he prepares for his final home game against Kansas. He carries a wooden board with the phrase “The Power of One.” The board is signed by the team members and means “all in as a team,” McCoy said. RALPH BARRERA/AMERICAN-STATESMAN.

Senior night. Colt McCoy’s last game at DKR. He threw for 396 yards in the win.

It does feel a little weird, though, knowing that at one point a Kansas football game was the best attended home game in Texas football history. There was a time, we swear, when Kansas football wasn’t terrible. In 2007, the Jayhawks went to the Orange Bowl and won. During coach Mark Mangino’s tenure, Kansas actually had strong seasons. But that was ending in 2009, along with Mangino’s employment. The coach would eventually lose his job that season.

More important, though, this was the win that handed No. 3 Texas its first Big 12 regular-season football title since 2005. It was McCoy’s record-tying 43rd win as a starter. Texas went on to play in the BCS national championship game.

4. UCLA 34, Texas 12, Sept. 25, 2010: Attendance 101,437

ORG XMIT: TXEG103 UCLA's Akeem Ayers (10) celebrates with teammate Sean Westgate (11) after he intercepted a pass by Texas' Garrett Gilbert during the second quarter in an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Sept. 25, 2010 in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
UCLA’s Akeem Ayers (10) celebrates with teammate Sean Westgate (11) after he intercepted a pass by Texas’ Garrett Gilbert during the second quarter. (ERIC GAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Not a good day for the Longhorns. In front of the largest crowd in DKR history at the time, the No. 7-ranked Longhorns, 3-0 entering the game, showed that the up-and-down performances leading to this weekend were troubling signs, not early season kinks. Texas allowed 264 rushing yards. It was the first home loss for the Horns since 2007 and their fewest points scored at home since 2006.

3. Ole Miss 44, Texas 23, Sept. 14, 2013: Attendance: 101, 474

The fans gave the Horns some support early in the game as they took a first half lead. They failed to score in the second half when the Rebels pulled away. Texas lost to Ole Miss 44-23 Saturday night September 14, 2013 at Darrell K. Royal Texas Memorial Stadium in Austin. The lopsided loss is the second in a row in the young season and brings much doubt in the success of the program under head coach Mack Brown. RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
The large crowd gave Texas lots of support early in the game as it took a first-half lead. But the Longhorns failed to score in the second half as Ole Miss pulled away. The lopsided loss was the second in a row in the young season. RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Texas was coming off a brutal 40-21 loss at BYU and changed defensive coordinators during the week. The change didn’t work. Ole Miss, which had lost to Texas 66-31 the year before, piled on in Mack Brown’s final season at Texas. David Ash was hurt and Case McCoy filled in, but it didn’t matter. Bo Wallace threw two touchdown passes for Ole Miss, and Jeff Scott ran for 164 yards.

2. Texas 34, Rice 9, Sept. 3, 2011: Attendance: 101,624

Ricardo B. Brazziell AMERICAN-STATESMAN 9/3/11 Texas Longhorns NO.2 Fozzy Whittaker scores a touchdown against Rice Owls in the second half of the game at Darrell K Royal- Texas Memorial Stadium on Saturday, September 3, 2011
Texas’ Fozzy Whittaker scores a touchdown against Rice as the Longhorns cruise to victory in the 2011 season opener. RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

After going 5-7 the year before, Texas entered the 2011 season with some renewed spirit, and so did the fans. The second-largest crowd in DKR history saw Texas  gain 506 yards in the season-opening romp over the Owls. Malcolm Brown rushed for 87 yards, the most by a true freshman since Jamaal Charles in 2005. Texas won four games to start that season before losing 55-17 to Oklahoma. This was the first game to air on the Longhorn Network, so considering this was, at time, the largest crowd in DKR history, the ratings might have taken a hit.

1. West Virginia 48, Texas 45, Oct. 6, 2012: Attendance: 101,851

10/6/2012 - Jay Janner/American-Statesman - West Virginia running back Andrew Buie scores a touchdown in the fourth quarter against UT on Saturday Oct. 6, 2012.
West Virginia running back Andrew Buie scores a touchdown in the fourth quarter against UT. JAY JANNER/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The largest crowd in DKR history saw Texas lose in West Virginia’s first trip to Austin as a member of the Big 12. Future NFL draft pick Geno Smith threw for 268 yards and four touchdowns in the No. 8-ranked Mountaineers’ win. But it was Andrew Buie’s 207 yards rushing that killed the Longhorns’ chances. Texas trailed 21-7 in the second quarter but led 28-27 at halftime. West Virginia took a 10-point lead with 1:18 left, and David Ash led Texas down the field to cut the score to 48-45 with 15 seconds left. But the Longhorns couldn’t get any closer.

 

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