Amateur Scottie Scheffler of UT hits a shot as his sister/caddie Callie looks on during the U.S. Open last year at Oakmont, Pa. (Photo by Sam Greenwood/Getty Images)

Golf

UT’s Scottie Scheffler takes the day off after historic Thursday

Posted June 18th, 2016

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Story highlights
  • Scheffler’s 1-under position had him tied for seventh as play ended on Friday
  • The UT junior's caddie this week is his older sister Callie, who’s taking a week off a summer internship
  • Lag putting is key in this week's U.S. Open

OAKMONT, Pa. – University of Texas junior Scottie Scheffler enjoyed a nice day of rest and some practice on day two of the U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club.

On Friday, Scheffler didn’t take a swing in competition, that’s because the Texas junior finished his first round Thursday afternoon and won’t tee off his second round until 6 a.m. Saturday after Thursday’s three rain delays backed the tournament off its schedule. Scheffler’s 1-under position had him tied for seventh as play ended on Friday.

So what’s gotten Scheffler into such a distinguished position at this big event?

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“I think my mental game has a lot to do with it,” Scheffler said. “Just trying to stay as patient as possible and not letting bad shots or maybe a bad hole or a bad stretch get to me.”

Amatuer Scottie Scheffler of the United States talks with his caddie and sister Callie Scheffler during the first round of the U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club on June 16, 2016 in Oakmont, Pennsylvania. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)
Amatuer Scottie Scheffler of the United States talks with his caddie and sister Callie Scheffler during the first round of the U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club on June 16, 2016 in Oakmont, Pennsylvania. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

Scheffler’s caddie this week is his older sister Callie, who’s taking a week off a summer internship.

“She’s interning for WorldLink,” the 19-year-old explained. “The only way I know it, it’s another college golfer’s dad that she’s working for. I think that was the big reason why she was able to get off work today. She’s pursuing a graduate degree in marketing right now, so she’s got a year to finish that up at A&M and a year left in college golf.”

So how is 21-year-old Callie’s experience going thus far at the U.S. Open?

“It’s been absolutely incredible, I’ve loved every minute of it,” Callie Scheffler said. “It’s surreal, just thinking of all the great players who’ve played on this course. Walking that same course is incredible.”

Callie has watched this event on television over the years but this is her second time attending the Open. In 2002 her father Scott and mother Diane took the siblings to the U.S. Open at Bethpage State Park in Farmingdale, N.Y.

“There’s still a picture of us in this really high grass at Bethpage,” Callie said.

She’ll have to do her best to keep her younger brother out of Oakmont’s high grasses the rest of the weekend.

This is the third pro tournament she’s caddied for her brother and, being that it is a major championship, there’s more to this event than most he plays in.

“There’s a lot more stuff going on than what I’m used to at an amateur tournament,: Scottie said. “We’ve got courtesy carts and security and a bunch of people around.”

He’s also trying to take down the best players in the world.

Thus far, Scottie has found a confidence with his putting, and at a U.S. Open that’s an important weapon to have.

“My lag putting was really good on the greens, and I made some good seven and eight footers that kind of helped me keep the round going towards the end, which was really helpful,” Scheffler said Thursday after his round.

Scheffler spent about an hour and a half on the range and putting green during Friday’s early afternoon play.

“I wish I would have played a little bit (Friday) but I just got to relax and get ready for round two,” Scheffler said.

He did however watch some of Thursday’s NBA Finals game and just couldn’t quite finish it.

“I was into it at the beginning, and then all of a sudden a few commercial breaks and I turned my head over and I was out,” Scheffler said.

 

 

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