Texas fans cheer during a timeout against West Virginia at Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium Nov. 12, 2016 in Austin Texas. West Virginia won the game 24-20. (Photo by James Gregg/American-Statesman.)

BEVO BEAT Football

Daily Longhorn football history: The 1967 season

Posted July 15th, 2017

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The Texas football program dates back to 1893. Each day, we look at a little piece of Longhorn history. We’re starting by looking at each Longhorn football season. 

Texas returned to the Associated Press poll in 1967, landing at No. 4. It was the seventh top-five preseason ranking for Texas since 1959, and sixth time Texas landed in the poll since it started only ranking the top 10. The AP poll only ranked the top 10 from 1961 to 1967.

This was the third year in a row that Texas lost four games in one season. Since being one point away in 1964 from winning back-to-back titles, Texas went 6-4 in 1965, 7-4 in 1966 and 6-4 in 1967. In other words, the fans may have been getting restless by the end of the 1967 season. Texas wasn’t bad, and certainly not dropping off. But three straight four-loss seasons is not a status quo Texas fans wanted.

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Texas lost its first two games of the season and were never ranked the rest of the season. The Longhorns then reeled off six straight wins, beating Oklahoma in Dallas and Arkansas on road during the streak.

But Texas A&M scored its first win over Texas since 1956 and the first win over Darrell Royal.

Think about that, from 1957 to in 1967, Texas went 27-6 against Texas A&M (10-1), Oklahoma (9-2) and Arkansas (8-3).

The loss to the Aggies was a rare blip for the Longhorns under Royal. Texas would win the next seven match-ups against Texas A&M, and Royal would retire with a 17-3 record against Texas A&M at Texas.

 

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